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Four science-backed benefits of CBD

CBD is quickly becoming one of the UK’s most popular nutrition supplements – but what are the real benefits?

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CBD is quickly becoming one of the UK’s most popular nutrition supplements

CBD entrepreneur, Jordan Donohue, cuts through the noise to bring you the real benefits – and the research behind them.

Thanks to its neuro-modulating and anti-inflammatory properties, CBD is quickly becoming one of the UK’s most popular nutrition supplements – and for good reason. To date, CBD has demonstrated positive effects in a range of areas including mental health, skin health, sleep health and general wellbeing. 

Despite this success, and perhaps because of it, CBD is often referred to as ‘snake oil’ – meaning it is sold as a solution to many problems but is effective towards none.

Furthermore, overzealous advocates of CBD have unintentionally added fuel to this fire, by claiming CBD is nothing short of a miracle cure.

This lack of clarity regarding CBD’s effectiveness has left the public somewhat dubious about the benefits of CBD and the potential it holds to improve their health.

In this article we have put together four benefits of CBD that are supported by science, in an attempt to cut through the noise.

CBD oil reduces public speaking anxiety

Anxiety is a condition that will affect one in three people in their lifetime. For suffers of anxiety, a fear of public speaking is said to be one of the major manifestations of the condition. Despite this, many sufferers continue to battle through public speaking engagements daily, often leaving them feeling anxious, stressed, and burnt out. Proponents of CBD often mention CBD’s anti-anxiety effects, but what does the research indicate?

In 2011 researchers at the University if Sao Paulo decided to test the effects of CBD oil on public speaking anxiety. Twenty four participants with anxiety were given a single dose of CBD oil or placebo, following which they were put through a simulated public speaking test designed to induce anxiety.

The results showed participants who were given CBD oil displayed significantly reduced levels of anxiety and cognitive impairment compared to the participants who did not receive CBD oil [1].

CBD creams can help to manage eczema

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Eczema is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that has a range of symptoms:

  • Itchy skin
  • Dry & sensitive skin
  • Inflamed & discoloured skin
  • Rough skin (can be leathery or scaly)
  • Oozing or crusting
  • Swelling

Due to the underlying inflammatory nature of eczema, it has been posited that CBD’s anti-inflammatory properties could be useful for people who want to manage eczema naturally, without the use of topical steroids. 

This hypothesis was put to the test in 2019 when researchers in Italy put 20 people with eczema through a trial using a CBD cream. The participants applied the CBD cream to their skin lesions twice per day for three months. During the three-month period no other skin treatments were used.

The results showed that the application of a CBD cream to eczema lesions improved their appearance, decreased redness, and improved skin hydration [2]. The eczema improving effects of CBD were demonstrated once again in 2020 when researchers at the University of Colorado showed that after using a CBD cream for two weeks, 50 percent of participants stated their eczema had improved by more than 60 percent [3].

CBD cream can help with back pain

Back pain effects millions of people worldwide and often leads to long term disability if not managed properly. Furthermore, back pain is one of the leading causes of absenteeism in the workplace, costing the economy millions each year. Due to the promise CBD has shown in areas such as neuropathic pain and inflammation, CBD has been touted as an effective tool in the management of back pain. 

A recent case study in the journal of opioid management has reported two cases where a CBD cream was able to provide pain and symptom relief to patients suffering from chronic back pain. [4]

Case 1

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A 40-year-old male visited his GP due to chronic back pain – something he had been suffering with for a while, due to a previous L3 compression fracture. The patient had a significant medical history and several previous issues in the spinal region. Due to not being suitable for surgery, the GP recommended a combination of pain killers and anti-inflammatory drugs, both of which did not provide significant relief.

2 weeks later in a follow up appointment the patient mentioned that due to the prescribed treatments providing no relief, he had decided to try a CBD cream for his back pain. The patient used a CBD cream that contained 400mg of CBD per 60ml pot and applied a small amount twice per day to the affected area.

Following use the patient reported that his back pain had reduced from an 8/10 to a 1/10 and that the frequency and severity of his back spasms had decreased. On average the pain relief would last for up to 10 hours. After four weeks of using the CBD cream the patient was able to significantly reduce the amount of medication he was taking as the CBD cream was so successful. 

Case 2

Following several surgical interventions, including the treatment of spinal cord cancer, a 61-year-old woman reported to her GP after experiencing loss of feeling and pain in her back for several years. Her medical history was complex and included rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative disc disease and pinched spinal nerves.

The patient decided to try CBD of her own accord and reported the results to her GP. When applied to the affected area the patient reported decreased pain and discomfort in her back for 7-8 hours.

CBD reduces the severity of delayed onset muscle soreness

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Delayed onset muscle soreness, often referred to as ‘DOMS’ is the feeling of soreness you get in a muscle following exercise. It most often occurs in people who exercise intensely, following a long period of not exercising, or in trained individuals who have pushed past their normal training intensities.

CBD has been proclaimed as a powerful post workout supplement that can help with recovery, but until recently there were no data to support such claims.

In 2020 researchers at the university of southern Carolina decided to test the effects of CBD oil on muscle soreness post workout. To elicit significant amounts of muscle damage, and thus soreness, the researchers made 24 trained men squat with 80 percent of their one-rep max until failure. After completing the exercise participants were given a single dose of either CBD oil, placebo, or nothing. The single dose of CBD oil provided 17mg of CBD.

Compared to the placebo and non-intervention groups, the participants who received CBD oil after squatting reported a reduced intensity and duration of muscle soreness in the week following exercise. The researchers noted that the exact mechanism behind this effect it still unknown and that further studies are required in the area [5].

Jordan Donohue is the founder of CBD brand Cannubu and has a background in nutritional science.

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“Three years on, disabled people need a solution”

PLEA’s advocacy director highlights how disabled patients are still suffering three years since the law change.

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Sajid Javid was Home Secretary when medical cannabis was legalised in 2018

Almost three years since the rescheduling of medical cannabis, disabled patients are still suffering, writes Lucy Stafford, advocacy director at PLEA (Patient-Led Engagement for Access).

In November 2018, current Health Secretary (and then Home Secretary) Sajid Javid ruled that medical cannabis would be made legally available for patients with chronic conditions.

At the time, he claimed the government had “now delivered on our promises.”

Today, the UK is the world’s leading producer of medical cannabis products, yet the overwhelming majority of eligible UK patients are still unable to access legal NHS prescriptions that could vastly improve their quality of life.

Instead, people suffering from chronic pain, Tourette’s disorder and other conditions have found themselves shackled with serious debt or even risking arrest as they attempt to seek treatment. Some patients report having to sell all possessions and even homes to fund private prescriptions.

Lucy Stafford medical cannabis patient

Lucy Stafford

A new report published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) identifies barriers to access for patients with Ehlers Danlos syndrome, as well as solutions to breaking the deadlock for patients with numerous conditions.

Javid returned as Health Secretary earlier this year. Patients and patient groups now demand that he revisit his decision on medical cannabis, and quickly address all obstacles, allowing meaningful access for the people who need it.

Disabled patients across the United Kingdom are demanding that Health Secretary Sajid Javid fully delivers on the government’s 2018 promises and makes legal medical cannabis accessible to patients with chronic and life-limiting conditions. Then Home Secretary, Javid’s November 2018 decision permitted legal prescriptions of the drug. And in these three years, the United Kingdom has emerged as the largest producer of medical cannabis, identified as such in research conducted by the United Nations.

But very little has changed for the majority of patients with chronic and life-limiting conditions. Many barriers to NHS access remain. And in fact, only three patients have been able to access ‘full spectrum’ (or ‘full plant’) medical cannabis via the NHS, since the medicine was made legal.

Kayleigh Ross, a patient working group member at PLEA, said: “The government has not ‘delivered on its promises’ as Javid stated. In 2021, this important treatment remains inaccessible to hundreds, if not thousands of people whose lives could be transformed but are instead encountering huge problems as they try and afford private prescriptions. Enough waiting. We need more than just words, we need things to change.”

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BMJ Report identifies barriers to access – as well as solutions

On the 9 September 2021, the BMJ published clinical practice guidance for the provision of non-inhaled medical cannabis for patients living with moderate to chronic pain, including people with neuropathic and cancer-related pain.

This follows the publication by the BMJ in July of a new case report, highlighting the barriers which still remain for patients with chronic and life-limiting disorders, including a lack of physician knowledge on the topic and education on medical cannabis use, restrictive guidelines and cost and supply issues.

Specifically relating to Ehlers Danlos syndrome – an inherited disorder that affects the body’s tissues – the report identifies ways of breaking the deadlock for patients, with solutions that include increasing UK production of medication and bulk importation of medical cannabis from around the world.

As highlighted in the BMJ’s case report, a lack of NHS access means that UK patients using legal medical cannabis are often having to pay for expensive private prescriptions. And those that can do this will often have to borrow from friends and family, sell possessions or go into long-term debt, in order to fund their treatment.

Lara Bloom, president and CEO at The Ehlers-Danlos Society said: “We hope that this report will support clinical expertise of this treatment option and expand research into this area. It’s unacceptable that patients are forced to resort to illegal routes of access when they cannot afford private healthcare – patients need NHS access to treatment, including cannabis-based medicinal products where appropriate.”

Patients are receiving life-changing treatment, but at what cost?

Jim Finch and his wife are having to sell their family home in order to pay for an ongoing prescription that has cost upwards of thousands of pounds for just ten days worth of treatment.

Jim Finch

Jim Finch developed Tourette’s after a serious car accident

A 2018 car accident that was no fault of his own resulted in serious injuries and trauma and left Jim with complex neurological conditions including Tourette’s Syndrome, fibromyalgia and functional neurological disorder. He went from a healthy, 29-year-old dad to being unable to walk or communicate properly and suffering dozens of fits and seizures a day.

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Jim was prescribed ‘hundreds of pills’ to manage his symptoms including Tramadol, Morphine, Diazepam, Codeine, amitriptyline, Lorazepam and Sertraline, which left him (in his own words) a ‘vegetable’. Now, he uses a vape of privately prescribed medical cannabis to help control his pain, tics and seizures.

Jim said: “It has changed me from bed-bound to housebound and I can now be a proper father to my young children. Before, that simply would not have been possible. I’m as close to my old self as I have been since before the crash. There’s the injustice that people are going to prison for trying to get help for themselves.

“There’s also an injustice that people have to pay so much for private prescriptions. My partner and I sold both our cars, used all our savings and have borrowed thousands from family in the past two years. We are now having to sell my house and move in with my in-laws, along with our children to be able to continue this life-changing treatment. And all of it just so I can be present as a father.’’

Building the UK evidence base

In November 2019, the UK scientific charity Drug Science launched Project Twenty 21 – an observational study of 1,500 patients to date, which aims to create the largest body of evidence for the efficacy of medical cannabis in the UK.

The study covers a range of primary conditions, the most common being anxiety and chronic pain, and has the ultimate aim of providing enough evidence to bring about better patient access for medical cannabis on the NHS. With the help of funding from industry producers, Project Twenty21 provides patients with medical cannabis products at a capped price, whilst collecting patient data to feed the UK evidence base with the goal of influencing the NICE guidelines.

Having spent my teenage years in severe pain, dependent on opiates and a feeding tube, my quality of life has been ‘transformed’ by medical cannabis.

Now aged 21, I am one of the few patients able to legally access medical cannabis in the UK. I do this through Project Twenty 21, which provides me with a subsidised private prescription that costs £450 a month, previously having paid £1,450 each month.

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Three years ago my life was a blur of excruciating pain from dislocating joints at the smallest of movements, needing support from full-time carers to even use a bedpan as I couldn’t get out of bed safely. I had countless injections of incredibly powerful opioid drugs to try and reduce my pain. They never worked and as I became weaker, the pain medications became stronger. I felt like a shell and had no hope or idea how I could keep living in that state – that’s what constant severe pain does to you.

Three years ago Sajid Javid saw the suffering of disabled people and the benefits that medicinal cannabis could bring. Thankfully, he changed the law to allow legal prescriptions. My doctor and I were thrilled. This was my last hope for a life-changing treatment, after which I would be referred to palliative care. But when my doctor wrote me such a prescription, it was denied funding and I was told I could not access the treatment on the NHS. I was devastated.

So like millions of other unwell people, I had no option but to break the law to find help. I was scammed, sent contaminated cannabis, left in vulnerable situations during drug deals and I was terrified of being caught. This was one of the lowest points of my life.

Today, as I am fortunate enough to be supported by my family to have a legal prescription, my health has never been better or more stable. I can now walk, sit, live independently, focus, study for a degree and live a generally normal life, away from hospitals and endless medical interventions. But funding life-saving medication is unsustainable as a disabled student on a very limited income, even at the heavily subsidised rate I receive as a patient with Project Twenty21. And I live in fear of losing access and getting sick again.

The current situation helps no one. Established medications, such as those that I was given, cost the NHS a great deal and can come with terrible side effects. The toll on the mental health of ineffectively treated chronic conditions, like my own, can make patients feel suicidal. And private prescriptions are expensive so people either can’t afford them or can be forced to choose between being in pain and being able to eat.

That’s barbaric, and something the NHS was created to prevent.

For more information visit PLEA (Patient-Led Engagement for Access)

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“Ireland has the most restrictive medical cannabis programme in the world”

Peter Reynolds on the issues facing the MCAP programme in Ireland

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Ireland: A doctor in a white lab coat with out stretched hands holding one cannabis leaf and another holding a bottle of oil

The HSE announced the first products available through Ireland’s medical cannabis access programme (MCAP) this week, but the system has been “sabotaged” by a medical establishment “hostile to cannabis”, argues Peter Reynolds.

Peter Reynolds is an advisory board member of Ireland Medical Cannabis Council.

Peter Reynolds is an advisory board member of the Irish Medical Cannabis Council.

Ireland has the most restrictive medicinal cannabis programme anywhere in the world and it’s still not operational more than four years after it was announced.

What’s even worse, as demonstrated by the letter, nine leading neurologists have sent to Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly, is the four products that the Health Products Regulatory Authority (HPRA) have selected are unsuitable for the conditions they are supposed to treat.

The story of how this has unfolded is a lesson in how not to regulate medicinal cannabis, or, indeed, any medicine. The programme is the result of public demand based on increasing recognition of the value and safety of cannabis when used responsibly under medical supervision. But it has been sabotaged by an Irish medical establishment that is hostile to cannabis, and officials who have refused to take expert advice, preferring the opinions of clinicians who know nothing about it.

The problems started right at the beginning with a report compiled by the HPRA early in 2017 described as from an ‘expert working group’, yet not one person in the group is an expert in cannabis. It’s not clear that any of them had any knowledge about the use of cannabis as medicine when they were appointed.

Ireland and cannabis

Unsurprisingly the report is full of errors and misunderstandings. It claims there is “an absence of scientific data” on the efficacy of cannabis and not enough information on safety. This is palpable nonsense.

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History records cannabis being used as medicine for more than 5,000 years and ironically, it was an Irishman, William Brookes Shaughnessy, who published the first scientific paper on it in the Lancet, in 1840. Since then it has been one of the most studied medicines on the planet. It has over 26,000 references on Pubmed, the foremost source for medical literature whereas paracetamol has around 12,000.

California has had a medicinal cannabis program since 1989, the Netherlands since 2001 and its use is now widespread throughout the world. Millions of people are using medicinal cannabis safely and effectively. There is a vast amount of information and evidence available.

The most glaring error in the report is the omission of pain as a condition for which cannabis should be available. Pain is the condition for which cannabis is most often used and is most effective. In 2020 the global market was valued at around $9 billion, this is expected to reach $47 billion by 2027 and over 60% of this is for treating pain. Yet the HPRA’s supposed experts thought it best to leave it out.

The HPRA started work on MCAP in March 2017. Officials claim to have sought “solutions to the supply of products from Denmark, UK, Canada and further afield”, which has included at least some officials going on international trips. It has taken four years to select four products, one of which is for epilepsy in adults and the other three are, as anyone with any expertise will confirm, best suited to treating pain!

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Responsibility for this situation lies squarely with the HPRA. It is matched by its corresponding failure to deal with many attempts to set up a medicinal cannabis industry in Ireland. At least a dozen serious proposals have been presented offering multimillion euro investments in Ireland, promising the creation of hundreds of new jobs.

Irish Cannabis industries

Professor David Finn at NUI Galway is one of the world’s leading researchers into cannabinoid medicines and even his participation has failed to galvanise the HPRA into action.

Medicinal cannabis is the fastest growing business sector in the world. It is coming to Ireland, irrespective of the negative and Luddite attitudes that prevail amongst the establishment.

What is clear is that public health, the Irish people and the Irish economy are missing out in a big way and many of the opportunities have now been lost for good.

Read more: HSE to offer first cannabis-based products on MCAP program from October

 

Peter Reynolds is president of CLEAR Cannabis Law Reform in the UK and an advisory board member of the Irish Medical Cannabis Council.

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Is it time for a T (tolerance)-break?

A medical cannabis prescriber explains why it’s important to take a break

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Medical cannabis users may experience their treatment becoming less effective

How do you know if it’s time to take a tolerance break? Dr Niraj Singh, a consultant psychiatrist and member of the Medical Cannabis Clinicians Society, explains.

Dr Niraj Singh

Dr Niraj Singh

Medical cannabis is used increasingly for a range of conditions including anxiety, depression, PTSD, ADHD, pain, fibromyalgia and others.

But we all need a break from time to time, and so it seems do our cannabinoid receptors. 

Readers will be familiar with the issue of tolerance developing with continuous use of medical cannabis. The definition of tolerance is “a person’s diminished response to a drug, which occurs when the drug is used repeatedly and the body adapts to the continued presence of the drug.”

The cannabinoid receptor 1 lies mainly within the brain and spinal cord. THC binds directly to this and CBD indirectly. With continuous binding of THC, CB1 become ‘down regulated’ ; this means a decrease in the number of receptors on the surface of target cells, making the cells less sensitive to THC binding. 

Medical cannabis users may experience this as their treatment becoming less effective and the requirement to take more for symptomatic relief.

Timing for development of tolerance will depend on one’s history of cannabis use, the chemovar of the product itself and other physiological factors. 

At times therefore the CB1 receptors need a rest. With reduced consumption, this gives the ‘overworked’ receptors a break, giving them a chance to expand in number again, a term called ‘up regulation’. 

The idea of reducing consumption can be anxiety provoking for users and not an easy one, however the benefits are unquestionable. With up regulation, a lesser amount of medical cannabis product is required for the same effect. Using less product, also means less financial expense. 

There is no specific guidance on the time frame for how long a tolerance break should be. Up regulation is said to take place 48-72 hours hours after stoppage and levels out between 21 days and 4 weeks after, so this is the range after which most benefits can take place. This is because THC clears the system completely within this latter period.  

A T-break has to be balanced with the patient’s circumstances, current symptoms, as well as risk of any deterioration in health. Treatment dosages can also be reduced gradually rather than sudden stoppage.

It’s important therefore that any tolerance breaks take place during periods of less stress. Alongside ensuring regular exercise and a healthy diet to boost the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is important. 

One can still use CBD and terpenes during the tolerance break periods. If there are any problems with sleep, natural supplements can be used.

Once medical cannabis is re-started, it’s important that this is gradually built up rather than starting back on the dosage used prior to the tolerance break.

It’s vital that the doctor and patient discuss the tolerance break and agree on a plan.  It’s important that patients discuss this with people in their household and those in close proximity as irritability and frustration can occur particularly in the early stages.

A few things to remember:

  • A T-break should be planned and measures put in place to ease it as best possible. Decide on a realistic time frame. Doctors and patients need to discuss and agree this also.
  • Ensure it happens at a time of fewer stressors but at the same time ensure a good level of activity is taking place to ensure the mind is focused elsewhere.
  • Ensure a healthy diet and adequate exercise. Connect with the natural environment.
  • Use natural supplements for sleep where required.
  • If needs be use CBD oil which is broad spectrum with a good range of terpenes.
  • Stay resolute but also realistic. Remember any break above 72 hours will be beneficial.
  • Build up the dosage gradually after re-starting.

Find out more about joining the MCCS here

If you’d like to share your experience and insight as a medical cannabis prescriber or patient, we’d love to hear from you. Please email sarah@handwmedia.co.uk

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