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Growing “appetite” for medical cannabis among UK clinicians

Over 300 health professionals have signed up to learn more about medical cannabis.

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Growing "appetite" for medical cannabis among UK clinicians
The Medical Cannabis Clinicians Society (MCCS) now has revealed it now has over 300 members.

Over 300 health professionals have signed up to learn more about medical cannabis in the UK since 2019.

Just two and half years after its launch, the Medical Cannabis Clinicians Society (MCCS) now has revealed it now has over 300 members, as it prepares to launch a series of in-person events this year.

Over 300 clinicians, including specialist consultants in a wide range of specialisms, GPs, nurses and allied health professionals, are now active members of the society, sharing best practice, learning from each other, and accessing regular expert support. 

Bosses say this growth demonstrates the “appetite” of health professionals to learn more about this “life-changing” medicine.

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Throughout 2022, the MCCS executive committee is planning to hold five in-person events across the UK, offering attendees a practical introduction to medical cannabis and CBD. 

The first events will take place in Manchester on Thursday 12 May and Belfast on 1 June, followed by sessions in Edinburgh, Cardiff and London before the end of the year. 

Further events are expected to take place in Liverpool, Newcastle, Bristol, Birmingham and Dublin in 2023.

Open to clinicians, medical students, scientists, researchers, professionals and patients curious about medical cannabis and the current state of prescribing, evidence and availability in the UK, the events will take place from 6.30pm for two hours, with networking and a panel Q&A for attendees following the speakers. 

Prescribing doctors from the executive committee will be joined at each event by society chair, Professor Mike Barnes, as well as medical cannabis patients.

Sativa Learning’s Ryan McCreanor and Volteface’s Katya Kowalski, will also present education opportunities and research insights. 

Professor Mike Barnes, chair of the Medical Cannabis Clinicians Society said:  “The growth we have seen in our membership over the last two and a half years demonstrates the appetite the UK’s clinicians have to learn about this life-changing medication. 

“With significant restrictions meaning that only Specialist Consultants can prescribe, little to no cannabis education for medical students, and the fact that medical cannabis is only available via privately prescribing doctors, the number of clinicians choosing to educate themselves and access support via the Society should be noted by leaders in the health service and in Government.

“Our programme of events, which will see us visit Manchester, Edinburgh, Belfast, Cardiff and London this year, and Liverpool, Newcastle, Bristol, Birmingham and Dublin in 2023, are a fantastic opportunity for clinicians and medical students particularly to learn the facts about this treatment and practical steps to prescribing.”

Hannah Deacon, executive director of the Medical Cannabis Clinicians Society, added:  “The Medical Cannabis Clinicians Society believes that everyone who could benefit from medical cannabis should have access to it. Our mission is to give clinicians access to evidence, training, expert guidance, peer support and licensed product information so they can prescribe life-changing medical cannabis treatments to all patients in the UK, on the NHS. 

“The Society is an expert-led, independent, not-for-profit community, dedicated to bringing this safe, legal and effective medicine to people living with chronic conditions.” 

The first event will take place at The Midland Hotel in Manchester at 6.30pm on Thursday 12 May. 

Dr Niraj Singh, consultant psychiatrist from The Medical Cannabis Clinics and executive committee member of the MCCS, will share his experience of becoming a medical cannabis prescriber. 

Prof Barnes will explore the history and evidence for medical cannabis.

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