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Patient Voices: Abby – “I’ve been masking with cannabis for most of my life”

After a recent diagnosis of ADHD and finding out she is autistic at the age of 32, Abby’s life is only just starting to make sense. 

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Abby Hughes (left) and Lucy Stafford

Abby Hughes has been self-medicating with cannabis since her teens, but after a recent diagnosis of ADHD and finding out she is autistic at the age of 32, her life is only just starting to make sense.

“At school all my teachers would say, ‘Abby does fantastic work, but she needs to stop being such a perfectionist’ – I always zone in on the little details, everything has to be uniform and colour-coded.

“I collect stones with holes in them and I spent my 21st birthday looking at train stations in Stockholm,” recalls Abby.

“I’ve always been a bit of a different cog in this weird little world and nobody realised.”

These little character traits are starting to make sense to Abby now, after she was diagnosed with ADHD this year aged 32 – and just a few weeks later found out she is autistic.

As a teenager she was diagnosed with depression and anxiety, prescribed medication and therapy to manage her symptoms, but now she is starting to look at her life through a different lens.  

“I was told I had anxiety and depression and found myself thrown into CBT therapies and taking various medications, but now I know it was actually undiagnosed ADHD,” she continues.

“I wasn’t a hyperactive little boy, so nobody saw it. We need to change perspectives on what these invisible conditions are and how they actually affect you.”

Attention deficit hyperactive disorder affects millions of children worldwide, but boys are more than twice as likely as girls to receive a diagnosis.

According to the Child Mind Institute, women tend to be older than men when diagnosed, partly because symptoms often present differently in them than in men and are less prevalent. 

Co-existing conditions, such as depression and anxiety can also cause complications which lead to a diagnosis being delayed.

Abby believes it is cannabis that has “helped her cope” for long, and may be the reason her symptoms were able to go under the radar.

“I’ve been using cannabis almost every day since the age of 14,” she says.

“It’s only now that I’m realising the extent that it has helped me to get on in the world. It has genuinely helped me cope at work and in social situations – some days I’m the life and soul of the party and others I’m just not in the mood for talking to anyone.”

She adds: “I’ve always relied on it, but I didn’t realise that it was my medication until a bit later. I’ve actually been masking for years and years using cannabis. I’m seeing it through this whole new lens.”

Growing up in Abby’s family, cannabis was known as “Nanny Carol’s herbal tea”. 

“My nan always used cannabis, we knew it wasn’t allowed, like alcohol or tobacco, but we had no idea it was an illicit drug – it was just my nan’s special ‘tea’. It was never in our faces, but it was never hidden from us either.

“I started using cannabis as a teenager after I was diagnosed with anxiety and depression and realised it was helping, but I didn’t have a routine or medicate properly, I just used it in social situations.”

But as she grew up and her health became more complex, cannabis began to provide physical relief too.

When Abby went to the doctors about the debilitating pain she experienced around her period – which could last for up to 10 weeks – she was told it was just “period pain” and given the implant to prevent them at just age 15.

“I didn’t want to tell my mum in case she thought it was for contraception,” she remembers.

When she was eventually diagnosed with endometriosis in 2012, she had the coil inserted, which she describes as the “worst thing that ever happened to her”.

“I had to have it out in a matter of weeks. Now I know I’ve got a tilted pelvis and I’m hyper-mobile, no one should have been rummaging around in there, but no one picked up on it for years.”

Doctors offered her drugs such as amitriptyline, gabapentinoids and fentanyl patches, but they failed to keep the pain under control and she continued to consume cannabis illicitly – even travelling to Amsterdam to find a strain which was supposed to be good for endometriosis.

By the time Abby was referred to a rheumatologist, more than a handful of people had told her symptoms sounded like Ehlers Danlos syndromes (EDS). 

She was diagnosed with fibromyalgia and hypermobility first, and then EDS at a specialist centre in London in 2017. 

EDS are a group of conditions which affect the connective tissue which provides support in skin, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, internal organs and bones.

It can affect people in different ways and in all parts of the body –  for some, the condition is relatively mild, while for others their symptoms can be disabling.

Abby saw a gastroenterologist who found problems with her intestines, and a cardiology specialist who told her she had Postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS) – which explained why she had been passing out for years and not knowing why.

Abby underwent major surgery in 2019.

“They basically saved me because they helped me understand what the hell was going on with my body,” she says..

“There were so many different things, but one thing all of my symptoms had in common was that they were helped by cannabis.”

At the time, Abby was working as an operations manager in the NHS in complex departments such as bariatric surgery, inherited metabolic diseases, neurology and at one point managing one of Europe’s largest bone cancer departments.

After dropping out of her creative media degree after one year, she says she got her job by “pure chance” aged 21 and went from a band three straight to management as she was good at “making im

provements in managing waiting lists.”

“They took a chance on me, but I don’t know how I did it,” she says.

“At one point it was me and seven people running the largest bone cancer centre in Europe, reporting directly to the chief executive.

“I masked my way through the whole thing and ironically, I was off my face on drugs, opiates, the whole time.”

 Abby ended up having a breakdown and was made redundant from her role, while on the waiting list for major orthopaedic surgery, herself.

“I lost my whole career because I got sick and they couldn’t understand why,” she says.

In February 2019, she underwent the invasive procedure, which involved cutting into her hip socket in three places as well as her femur and having metal work implanted in her legs. 

Doctors warned her it would take her 10 times longer to recover due to her PoTS.

“By day three other people would be up and walking, so I was getting really frustrated,” she says. 

“I told the nurses and started taking a THC oil that my friend had made. The next day I didn’t only walk, but I walked up three stairs. The nurses let me keep using the oil because they could see how it was helping me.”

Losing her job meant she was finally able to be honest about her cannabis consumption. 

“I’d been doing a bit of advocacy around cannabis and I’d been carefully telling people in the NHS, asking them about the endocannabinoid system as though I didn’t know anything about it. I was finally able to come out and be a patient and be truthful about it. The law had changed but I still couldn’t afford to get a prescription.”

As of 2020, Abby now has a medical cannabis prescription, which she describes as a “life-changer”.

The same year, she helped launch PLEA (Patient-Led Engagement for Access) with a group of other patient advocates to challenge the inequalities in accessing cannabis medicines on the NHS.

“Now I’m prescribed it, I’m in an even better place. I was on Tramadol, amitriptyline, dihydrocodeine, diazepam dozens of different drugs. They have all been replaced with CBD oil, and two types of THC flower, and that is all I take.”

“It’s been a game-changer, I can get up in the mornings and be productive.”

A few weeks ago, she shared a video of her and friend and PLEA co-founder Lucy Stafford rollerblading three miles along the coast in Brighton.

“Having a continuous source of medication is what has enabled me to go out and rollerblade as part of my recovery, something I never would have imagined was possible.”

PLEA has celebrated a number of significant achievements since its launch exactly one year ago, including hosting the first ever Medical Cannabis Awareness Week in November 2020. 

The hub of the organisation, PLEA’s Patient Working Group gives patients a voice and ensures their experiences are at the centre of the UK sector as it develops.

“PLEA is completely independent and volunteer run, it is built by patients for patients, because we should be centred and amplified in this sector,” says Abby.

“There isn’t a day off for us, every day we get patients messaging us, academics wanting to speak to us, journalists getting in touch, which we are really grateful for, but it’s non-stop.

As chair and outreach director – alongside the many other hats she wears – including as a Project Twenty21 patient access consultant and a co-founder of Plant Ed Collective – it’s often taken for granted that Abby is a patient herself.

“People just see me rollerblade and think I’m fine, but I’m not. I can go rollerblading sometimes, but sometimes I need a stick to help me walk.

“I’m a patient too and it’s cannabis that has enabled me to do all this,” adds Abby.

“And I think having ADHD helps.”

In our Patient Voices series, we’re sharing the stories of members of PLEA’s Patient Working Group.

Read what medical cannabis means to EppieGillian, Margaret and Jonathan

Find out more about the PLEA patient working group here & visit pleacommunity.org.uk  for further resources

 

 

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Everything you need to know about medical cannabis in Mexico

Mexico has a long and complicated history when it comes to cannabis.

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Mexico has a long and complicated history when it comes to cannabis.

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Mexico has a long and complicated history when it comes to cannabis. The experts at Juicy Fields break down everything you need to know.

The cannabis plant has a long history of medical use, as it was included in the US pharmacopeia in 1850 for its sedative and anticonvulsant effects. Technically speaking, its history is complicated, as the British Government removed it from pharmacopeia in 1941. 

Most recently, the medical use of cannabis for treating deliberating chronic pain conditions has come back under the spotlight. As of today, several countries and 29 US states legally allow the medical use of cannabis. 

In June 2017, Mexico legalised medical cannabis.

The legal panorama in Mexico

Mexico has had a long and complicated relationship with cannabis throughout its history. Marijuana has been grown in Mexico since the 16th century when hemp was famous for rope and textiles. But the production of cannabis for recreational use was banned in 1920. 

At the end of 2015, an NGO filed a request to the COFEPRIS – Mexican commission of Health Risk to legalise medical cannabis. The COFEPRIS denied the authorisation, but the Supreme court ordered the COFEPRIS to issue the corresponding license for only non-commercial use.

Similarly, at the end of 2015, a district court ordered COFEPRIS to authorise the import and personal use of the drug for epileptic patients. 

Recently, in February 2016, COFEPRIS authorised the import of drugs produced by the Californian company Medical Marijauan Inc. for young epileptic sufferers.

Following a heated debate, the Mexican Senate and Lower House Congress approved a bill legalising the use of medical cannabis. As a consequence of that debate, on June 9, 2017, the Mexican president issued a decree legalising the therapeutic use of cannabis.

Medical cannabis regulations in Mexico

On January 12, 2021, Mexico’s Ministry of Health published rules regulating the use of medical cannabis. The Mexican government issued the first major cannabis reform measures on their three-year-old medical marijuana program. 

The primary focus of these regulations is on cannabis cultivation for both research and pharmacological products.

Moreover, legalisation allows private and public research with quality control measures and good manufacturing practices.

Doctors who want to practice cannabis will need to register with another agency – COFEPRIS. Medical cannabis will be available in pharmacies. 

Mexico offers an open door for medical cannabis tourism, both Mexican citizens and foreigners can travel with medical cannabis products in the country. 

Mexico medical marijuana programme

With the legalisation of medical cannabis, the marijuana and hemp companies keen to participate in emerging medical cannabis programmes. The new regulatory structure for medical marijuana in the company making it possible for companies to apply for research licenses. 

On 10 March, 2021, the Mexico Chamber of Disputes legalised the production of cannabis for industrial, medical, and recreational purposes.

The Mexican Senate will approve these modifications. In other countries, cannabis was legalised via the ballot, while in Mexico, it was mandated by the Supreme Court in 2018.

The Supreme Court found that criminalisation violates the constitutional right of Mexicans.  

Once the law passes, Mexico will be the third country to legalise all aspects of cannabis after Uruguay and Canada. 

The implementation of laws will deliver the purported and hoped outcomes:

  • Advancement of civil liberties
  • Reduction in prison populations
  • Reduction in law enforcement abuses
  • Economic generation of economic revenue for the government
  • Improvement in social conditions of poor, marginalised populations
  • Decrease in violent criminality

Under the New Marijuana Law, adults over 18 will be able to purchase and possess less than 28g of cannabis.

However, possession of up to 200g is subject to a fine of $500, while possession of more than 200g can land you in six months prison.

In addition, adults cultivating more than eight cannabis plants can be imprisoned for up to 10 years.

Opportunities for the growing section

According to many sources, the decree opens the door to external investments as many companies in the medical cannabis business may consider the opportunity to expand to Mexico.

Stuart Titus, Medical Marijuana’s chief executive, said Mexico represents a $1 billion to $2 billion opportunity of revenues in the next ten years.

A green wave – Mexico’s marijuana market may be middling

Lawmakers in Mexico are on the verge of legalising marijuana due to its monetary benefits. People in the business world are predicting a Mexican green boom – a new legal and thriving industry offering thousands of jobs, millions of dollars in profits, and the government’s tax revenue.

The cannabis industry promoters are enthusiastic about the prospect, as it will generate income in terms of employment, local economy, and taxation. 

With more than 120 million people, Mexico will represent a substantial marijuana industry. It will be an excellent, economical, natural, ethical, and moral solution for the country. 

The Cannabis Expo, Mexico

The Cannabis Expo Mexico, presented by JuicyFields, is the largest comprehensive cannabis convention and exhibition to take place in the LATAM region, with global industry leaders and local government representatives taking part in moderated panel discussions and presenting talks on a wide range of cannabis-related topics.

Delegates and VIPs have access to the exhibition hall featuring the full spectrum of local and international cannabis businesses, as well as dedicated Networking Areas and the Conference Auditorium hosting presentations and panel discussions throughout the event.

The event will be held in Mexico City, at Expo Santa Fe, from 24 – 25  June.

You can also access a Virtual Pass to attend from anywhere in the world. Get your tickets here.

 

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“Everyone involved deserves a special thank you” – My journey to a medical cannabis prescription

Medical cannabis patient Jack Pierce shares his journey to accessing a legal prescription

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Jack Pierce has thanked those who make it possible for him to access medical cannabis

After Cannabis Health revealed that clinicians were experiencing abuse from some patients, Jack Pierce wanted to share the positive experience he had accessing a medical cannabis prescription.

My journey began several years ago when just like many others, I was struggling greatly with my mental health and found it creeping into all areas of my life.  

I was constantly anxious and felt as though I was in an empty pit of despair. I would often experience episodes of stress, which would lead to long periods of upset, confusion and difficulty.

I struggled to hold down jobs, relationships and then friendships became also difficult. I had frequent issues managing socially and trying to live what would be considered a normal life even with my closest loved ones. I became further withdrawn from society and only found positives in my special interests and routines, if these were to be removed, I would have periods of high stress and emotional distress.

Due to all this negativity, I began to seek treatment from the NHS in the forms of therapy and was prescribed, like many others, antidepressants and anti-anxiety medication to try to combat the symptoms I was facing. 

Jack Pierce with his prescribed cannabis medicine

During this time, I also began to self-medicate with medical cannabis as I had found this helped my symptoms when I was depressed, anxious and suffering from other issues such as stress meltdowns and attention problems.  It also seemed to improve my physical health concerning my back and my diet.

However, like many others, I had to keep this treatment secret due to the fears of judgement and prosecution due to the plant’s criminal status. 

Cannabis medicine gave me hope and a reason to carry on. It meant my life was liveable, just like any other person’s. I have not stopped using cannabis since to treat and manage my symptoms, as without the flower I would be lost.

The medication prescribed by the NHS had very little effect and often came with severe reactions such as night terrors and health problems. My insomnia only began to worsen during this time as stress from my daily life increased and my mental health began to take a hit. 

I had then been prescribed medication to combat the sleeping issues I was facing, as I would be awake for almost two days at a time. Again, the medication came with addictive side effects as well as the feeling of withdrawal after consumption.

I sought out further help from my GP and local services and was officially diagnosed with what they thought had been anxiety and depression, but was actually autism.

Due to the recent diagnosis, I learned why the general medication prescribed to treat my illness would not work and I was left confused and worried about how I would treat the symptoms I faced daily, which caused life to almost be unbearable.

I began to look at how I could use cannabis legally in the UK as the current laws consider patients like myself as criminals, who only contribute to the lower levels of society. Which is not the case.

Here is my journey to accessing a legal medical cannabis prescription, so far:

Getting a medical cannabis card 

The first step I took was to access a medical cannabis card from CanCard UK. 

The UK-based organisation works towards giving patients access to a medical identification card that shows the patient is using the plant for medicinal purposes.

Once I had received my card my anxiety reduced greatly, I felt safer when having to purchase my medication the only way possible. The card meant that my self-medicating was deemed acceptable by those close to me, as it was for medicinal purposes not  recreational like many people  think. 

However, despite having the card I still felt limited in the way I had to receive the medication, often having to put myself at risk and being  taken advantage of financially was the only option. 

Accessing a private prescription

I began to do some more research and came across a company called Sapphire Medical Clinics, which I booked my first appointment with. 

The appointment was to take place over Zoom within two weeks of payment which I found to be a huge positive and reduced my anxiety almost straight away. 

My final reasoning was that this form of treatment was not only more appropriate for me,  but more importantly, I was growing tired of funding a criminal network that would only take advantage of me due to my disabilities.

What was the first appointment like?

My first appointment went smoothly. The doctor I saw was very understanding of my conditions and previous history, which eased my anxiety greatly. 

We spent a large amount of time discussing why and how I used cannabis already. 

I consume my flower as a medicine three times a day, as I find it best to manage and function this way. We discussed which treatment I would benefit most from and in the doctor’s opinion, this would be a High THC flower with a low amount of CBD to help manage my disability.  

The positives here are not just centred around the fact I can receive my flower this way. There is great reward in finally being understood by a doctor who understands the use of medicinal cannabis and to be able to discuss an effective treatment plan, rather than purchasing off someone with very little knowledge of the product.

The doctor was able to refer my case to the board meeting which takes place weekly to decide patients eligibility. Of course, I had anxiety about this like any other patient, would I be accepted? Would my money be wasted? Would I still have to use  the same old route? 

But after a few days of waiting, I was accepted and was prescribed the Indica flower the doctor had spoken of. This would be sent to the private pharmacy.

Receiving my medication

Now all the hard work had been done, it was just a matter of paying for my medication and waiting to receive it. As the flower is a Schedule 2 Controlled Substance the flower must be prescribed in written form and sent to the private pharmacist via courier. 

The pharmacy then logs this prescription and forwards a very simple invoice with a payment link attached. Once the payment is received the medication is then sent on a next day delivery service via DPD. This is so much better than the  route of access I was used to.

What was the quality of the medication like?

I had been prescribed an Indica Flos as my first flower and was to vape 0.3mg three times per day, just as I had been doing previously. 

I saw no difference in changing from black market cannabis to medicinal cannabis, apart from the flower felt cleaner and lighter to vape which is a huge positive for patients who already have pre-existing conditions which affect breathing.

The sweet lemon terpenes of the flower captivated my nose with the undertones of woody earth to compensate. The flower is a very uplifting high energy flower that is great for managing my autism in the daytime. 

I have found my anxiety to be reduced and my productivity increasing. I can concentrate on my studies and spend longer improving my work and myself. 

I also feel I am closer with my loved ones due to the fact that my mood is better managed, along with my communication issues, once I have consumed my medication.

The clinicians I have met have been nothing but caring professionals with a real passion to help and therefore deserve a special thank you from not only myself but other patients who have been benefited. 

If it were not for the clinics, I would still be at a loss and constantly being taken advantage of by black market providers, just so I could live what would be classed as a normal life.  

I would like to place a special thank you here to all the doctors, clinicians and pharmacists who are all involved in the process of supplying my medicine and that of other patients, as if it were not for you our lives would be an endless struggle.

Why should I consider getting a private prescription?

Overall, I would recommend any person suffering from a condition that could be helped by medicinal cannabis to look into seeking private treatment and not to be put off by the costs. 

Yes, private medicine is considered expensive initially, but so is the high standard of flower you have to purchase on the black market which is not regulated.

To be able to converse with a qualified doctor is so much more reliable and healthier for those suffering anxiety and stress disorders like myself. 

I have found the improvements to my quality of life and mental health have been staggering in just four weeks of receiving the flower and I hope for this to continue in the years to come.

For anyone thinking about beginning their journey with medical cannabis I would implore you to conduct your research into which clinics could help you and to take control of your medication once and for all.

I would also like to take this time to remind current and potential patients that we are very lucky to have access to such a service considering the legislation surrounding medical cannabis.

We all need to show the same respect to keep this help service alive and not risk patients returning to old routes which worsen their health and society as a whole.

 

 

 

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“It was always about building a community” – Savage Cabbage CBD five years on

As the UK brand Savage Cabbage CBD marks its fifth anniversary, what does the next chapter hold? 

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Savage Cabbage has been the official UK distributor of Charlotte’s Web hemp CBD oil for the last four years.

Five years since launching Savage Cabbage CBD, Jade Proudman is one of the UK’s leading CBD experts, working closely with the world-famous Charlotte’s Web. As the brand marks its fifth anniversary, she reflects on the progress so far and looks forward to a new chapter.

It was Charlotte Figi, the little girl who created a movement and kick-started the world’s CBD industry, who finally convinced Jade Proudman it was worth a shot.

Charlotte, who suffered from a rare form of epilepsy known as Dravet syndrome famously discovered that a CBD oil, produced by Colorado growers the Stanley brothers, helped keep her seizures under control and vastly improved her quality of life.

Diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS/ME) at the age of 14, Jade has battled her own health issues, including epilepsy and arthritis over the years. At her lowest point, she recalls barely being able to leave the sofa due to the side-effects from her medication.

But after watching Dr Sanjay Gupta’s CNN documentary following Charlotte’s journey, Jade was finally persuaded to try CBD.

“I was reluctant to try it, as I’d had a negative experience of cannabis when I was younger, but seeing this little girl on the screen, taking these oils and doing really well, it convinced me,” she explained.

“The fact that it had such a positive impact on my own health, triggered a eureka moment for me and I realised that I needed to tell people about it.”

Jade launched Savage Cabbage in 2016, a time when little was known about CBD and misinformation even led to accusations that she was using “drugs”.

Jade Proudman, founder and CEO of Savage Cabbage

But in a short space of time Jade was supplying products to customers around the world and building a community of people, many of whom were suffering and needed support.

“It was always about building a community for me,” said Jade.

“I’d never run my own business before, and I just thought, if I was that person at the end of the phone, what would I need? 

“We hit 44 countries without any paid advertising, that was all through communications, chats on Facebook and word of mouth here and there.”

In the early days, Jade partnered with Realm of Caring (RoC), a non-profit organisation setup by Charlotte’s mum Paige Figi and the Stanley brothers to support families around the world to gain education and understanding of cannabinoids. 

Her relationship with Paige and the brothers blossomed, and led to Savage Cabbage becoming the official UK distributor of Charlotte’s Web hemp CBD oil for the last four years.

Jade was devastated when Charlotte passed away on 7 April 2020, at the age of 13.

She had been due to fly out to Colorado to meet her in February, but the outbreak of Covid-19 meant she was unable to travel. 

“It’s very difficult to grieve for someone when you’re not directly related or connected to them,” she said. 

“Charlotte was just incredible, when she passed I just felt this void, I didn’t know what to feel, it was like a punch to the gut.

“As a company, Savage Cabbage put out a letter to Charlotte, saying that we would continue to run with this torch and I committed to do my very best to keep her legacy going. I maintain that to this very day.”

Despite not getting the chance to meet Charlotte in person, Jade remains close to Paige and the brothers and Savage Cabbage recently donated £5,000 to help RoC host Rock the RoC, a virtual tribute concert to mark the anniversary of Charlotte’s death. 

It’s not the first time the brand has stepped up. Over the last five years Jade has donated in the region of £50,000 worth of products to those who need support in maintaining access to wellness products.

As Savage Cabbage prepares to move into the next stage of business development, Jade is exploring the potential for a more structured approach to the charitable arm of the brand moving forward.  

She also now offers personal consultations with customers through the website, a role which she describes as not a million miles away to her former career in social work.

She said: “Although I left social work when I got sick, I’ve actually stepped back into it but just wearing a different uniform. 

“We’ve tried to be responsive and flexible to customer needs and to go that extra mile to ensure that they get those needs met. The customer journey is the most important part of what we do.”

The strategy seems to have paid off, with Savage Cabbage just about to launch in Europe and plans to expand its product offering to concentrate on the growing wellness sector beyond CBD.

“We’ve seen rapid growth in the wellness sector,” said Jade. 

“Now is the time to reflect and reconsider what is available for the UK consumer. People are switching to a more self-care approach to life, they don’t want to be at the doctor’s every five minutes.

“I want to focus on additional health and wellness products that are not necessarily CBD-related but are of high quality and new to the market, but we’ll take our time with it and make sure we get it right.”

Jade has carved a career in the industry as a CBD expert in her own right, a regular on the expo and cannabis conference scene (pre-covid restrictions) and holds advisory roles with respected educational organisations, such as MedCan Support.

Savage Cabbage is also continuing to collaborate and grow its valued partnership with Charlotte’s Web.

“Deanie [Elsner, CEO and president of Charlotte’s Web] is an amazing woman,” said Jade. 

Deanie Elsner, CEO and president, Charlotte’s Web

“The fact that she and I are working together demonstrates two strong women in a very male dominated industry, acknowledging and recognising each other’s skills, and commitments, and combining our efforts to grow our outreach.”

And Deanie sent her congratulations to Jade from across the pond.

“On behalf of Charlotte’s Web, I congratulate Savage Cabbage CBD upon its five-year anniversary and sincerely thank Jade for the vitally important work she has done to open up access to hemp CBD wellness products in the UK and beyond,” she said.

“We’re excited to continue our partnership with her as we work together to expand our reach internationally. The ‘Wellness Awakening’ taking place is a global phenomenon, and we intend to be a hemp CBD leader around the world so that access to these botanical products will be possible for millions of wellness seekers.”

But Jade’s experience as a woman – not to mention a patient – navigating trials and tribulations of the cannabis industry, has not been without its challenges. 

“I think a lot of people have made assumptions that I was not cut out for this and underestimated my abilities,” she said.

“You’ve really got to believe in yourself because it’s a challenging industry, but if you look hard enough there’s always good people around you who will help.”

Starting from the kitchen table in the Proudman family home, Savage Cabbage has grown into a dynamic team, with 10 forward-thinking individuals now in senior management roles, to ensure the brand continues to go from “strength to strength”.

“I didn’t do this by myself, without my community and my team, we wouldn’t exist,” said Jade. 

“If you have got the right people around you, you will go from success to success.”

And there’s one little girl who Jade keeps especially close.

“Charlotte’s always with me in my heart when I’m speaking to parents, families and individuals,” she added.

“She kick-started this whole industry, without her and the Stanley brothers would there be a CBD industry like there is today? I don’t think so.”

 

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